Jagannatha Rath Yatra

MAAANANDAMAYEEMAASANATHRatha Jatra, the Festival of Chariot: Chariots of Shri Jagannath is celebrated every year at Puri, the temple town in Odisha, on the second (dwitiya) day of shukla pakshya (waxing cycle of moon) of Ashadh Maas (3rd month in Lunar Calendar). The presiding deities of the Jagannath Temple, Puri’s main temple, Lord Jagannath, Lord Balabhadra and Goddess Subhadra, with the celestial wheel (Sudarshana Chakra) are removed from the temple in a ceremonial procession to their chariots. The huge, colourfully decorated chariots are drawn by multitude of devotees on thebada danda, the grand avenue to the Gundicha Temple (Gundicha – King Indradyumna’s Queen), two miles away to the North.

On their way back from the Gundicha Temple, the three deities stop for a while near the Mausi Maa Temple (Aunt’s abode) and have an offering of the Poda Pitha, which is a special type of pancake supposed to be the Lord’s favourite. After a stay for seven days, the deities return to their abode

The three chariots of Balarama, Subhadra and Jagannatha are newly constructed every year with wood of specified trees like phassi, dhausa, etc. They are customarily brought from the ex-princely state of Dasapalla by a specialist team of carpenters who have hereditary rights and privileges for the same. The logs are traditionally set afloat as rafts in the river Mahanadi. These are collected near Puri and then transported by road.MAAANANDAMAYEEMAASANATH

The three chariots are decorated as per the unique scheme prescribed and followed for centuries stand on the Bada Danda, the Grand Avenue. Covered with bright canopies made of stripes of red cloth and combined with those of black, yellow and blue colours, the huge chariots are lined across the wide avenue in front of the majestic temple close to its eastern entrance, which is also known as the Sinhadwara or the Lion’s Gate.jaga27

Lord Jagannatha’s chariot is called Nandighosa. It is forty-five feet high and forty-five feet square at the wheel level. It has sixteen wheels, each of seven-foot diameter, and is decked with a cover made of red and yellow cloth. Lord Jagannatha is identified with Krushna, who is also known as Pitambara, the one attired in golden yellow robes and hence the distinguishing yellow stripes on the canopy of this chariot.

Nandighosa Rath

The chariot of Lord Balarama, called the Taladhwaja, is the one with the Palm Tree on its flag. It has fourteen wheels, each of seven-foot diameter and is covered with red and blue cloth. Its height is forty-four feet.

Taladhwaja Rath

The chariot of Subhadra, known as Dwarpadalana, literally “trampler of pride,” is forty-three feet high with twelve wheels, each of seven-foot diameter. This chariot is decked with a covering of red and black cloth – black being traditionally associated with Shakti and the Mother Goddess.

Dwarpadalana or Padmadhwaja Rath

Around each of the chariots are nine Parsva devatas, painted wooden images representing different deities on the chariots’ sides. Each of the chariots is attached to four horses. These are of different colours – dark ones for Balarama, white ones for Jagannatha, and red ones for Subhadra. Each chariot has a charioteer called Sarathi. The three charioteers attached to the chariots of Jagannatha, Balarama and Subhadra respectively are Daruka, Matali and Arjuna.

Java Programming

Java – CSV File Reader

JJMP

One of the most common types of data file is a CSV (Comma Separated Value) file. They can be exported by many popular applications, notable spreadsheet programs like Excel and Numbers. They are easy to read into your Java programs once you know how.

Reading the file is as simple as reading a text file. The file has to be opened, a BufferedReader object is created to read the data in a line at a time.

Once a line of data has been read, we make sure that it’s not null, or empty. If it is, we’ve hit the end of the file and there’s no more data to read. If it isn’t, we then use the split() method that’s a member of Java’s String object. This will split a string into an array of Strings using a delimiter that we give it.

The delimiter for a CSV file is a comma, of course. Once we’ve split() the string, we have all the element in an Array from which our Java programs can use the data. For this example, I just use a for loop to print out the data, but I could just as well sort on the values of one of the cells, or whatever I need to do with it in my program.

Starting to Program :

  • Open the file with a BufferedReader object to read it a line at a time.
  • Check to see if we’ve got actual data to make sure we haven’t finished the file.
  • Split the line we read into an Array of String using String.split()

The Program

// CSVRead.java
//Reads a Comma Separated Value file and prints its contents.

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class CSVRead{

 public static void main(String[] arg) throws Exception {

  BufferedReader CSVFile = 
        new BufferedReader(new FileReader("Example.csv"));

  String dataRow = CSVFile.readLine(); // 

  while (dataRow != 0){
   String[] dataArray = dataRow.split(",");
   for (String item:dataArray) { 
      System.out.print(item + "\t"); 
   }
   System.out.println(); // Print the data line.
   dataRow = CSVFile.readLine(); // Read next line of data.
  }
  // Close the file once all data has been read.
  CSVFile.close();

  System.out.println();

 } //main()
} // CSVRead

 

Writing to CSV Files with Java

Writing to a CSV file is as simple as writing a text file . In this case, we write a comma between each field, and a newline at the end of each record.

Give it a try, starting with TextSave.java, modify it appropriately, then see what your favorite spreadsheet program thinks of the results.

Nabakalebara Rath Yatra Puri

image2Rath Yatra is the celebration of the Lord Jagannath (Odia: ଜୟ ଜଗନ୍ନାଥ, Hindi: जय़ जगन्नाथ, Bengali: জয় জগন্নাথ), who is believed to be the Lord of Universe’s journey towards his aunt’s house. Though it is a Hindu shrine but this chariot festival is not associated with any particular denomination of Hinduism entirety. It is the festival for all the devotees who have devotion for Lord Jagannatha and love for the deities.

Jagannath Rath Yatra is more than five thousand years old and the most spiritual thing is, the celebration follows all the same rituals from its starting. There would not seen any changes in this festival. Traditionally the Rath Yatra festival is celebrated annually in Puri, Odisha. During this world renowned festival, lord Jagannatha is worshipped along with his brother lord Balabhadra and sister Devi Subhadra.

According to spiritual significance of Katha Upanishad- The festival talks about Human body as Rath and sarathi or driver as God, who drives the chariot of body to the yatra/journey to material existence or Bhavasagar. Classically it is mentioned as- The soul drive with in the Rath of body, which has been intellect and total devoted to God the driver of the chariot towards the material existence. The wheels are the significance of velour. The horses are and persistence. The horses are the synonyms of vigor, self discipline, tolerance, charity and discrimination, where as pity, equanimity and forgiveness are the reins of horses.

The popular Rath jatra is the time when the Deities come out of the temple for all to see. Each deity visit Gudicha Temple in their specific chariots drawn by devotees. Gudicha temple is dedicated to Lord’s Mosi (Aunty).

The chariots used during Rath Yatra are built every year. Carpenters began the construction of chariots on the Akshaya Tritiya day. The chariots are painted with bright colors and the tops are covered with red, black, yellow, or green canopies. Lord Jagannath uses red and yellow, Lord Balaram uses red and green, while Goddess Subhadra uses red and black. All the chariots have separate features to distinguish from each other.

Lord Jagannath’s chariot is called as Chakradhwaja or Nandhighosa, which simply describe about tumultuous and blissful sound. 45 feet tall, 16 wheels, 65 tons weigh, Garuda on its crest along with four white wooden horses are the specific features of Lord Jagannath’s Rath.

Lord Balaram’s cart is called Taladhwaja, which means the sound of significantly powerful rhythm. It has 14 wheels, and is drawn by four black wooden horses. It carries Hanuman on its crest.

Goddess Subhadra’s cart is called Padmadhwaja or Darpadalan, which means destroyer of pride. It has a lotus on its crest, uses 12 wheels, and is drawn by four red wooden horses.

On the celebration day devotees pull the chariots till the Gundicha temple. This time in Rath Yatra Puri 2015 also you will see the same celebration but wide more spiritual excitement. Because it is the Nabakalebar Rath Yatra where all the Lords will get new avatar after nineteen years. The return journey of Lords is also celebrated as Bahuda yatra. The deities reach the Puri temple on Ekadasi day, than attired in new costumes and this new form of the idols is known as ‘Suna Vesa’ . So come to be a part of Puri Rath Yatra 2015 to see new looks of deities and get blessing for your lifetime.

We wish all the readers a very Happy Rath Yatra, May Lord Jagannatha, Maa Subhadra and Lord Balarama shower blessings on all of us.

Jai Jagannatha 🙂